Fine Wind, Clear Morning

In the second iteration of the 36+10 views of Mt. Fuji project I am undertaking, the central figure of the drawing is the mountain itself without any compromise. For reasons very clear to the viewer, this drawing is also referred to as “Red Fuji” and sometimes “South Wind, Clear Sky” but I think the original title is refined enough and does not need anything else.

For most of my watercolor paintings, I use a homemade 24 pan palette that I should really do a blog post for so I can refer to it everywhere. It contains many paints that granulate heavily which I really love for urban sketching, the granulation will suggest details and will give everything a texture of having lived. For the wood print here replicated and in fact for most of those to come, the coloring is much smoother, using ink instead of pigments and creating texture by refined linework or gradients rather than the paints itself.

As a result, I will need to leave my travel palette in it’s bag for this project which is fine as I will not paint on the road anyway and I bought a few palette boxes over the last few years that get way too little use.

Fine Wind, Clear Morning was colored using the St. Petersburg wooden White Nights 48 set and I would advice anyone that likes painting not to buy it. Rather get a metal set as now you have mixing wells that are very absent in the wooden box. It is a very lovely box tho so if you want to give someone you love a gift, the wooden box is perfect. If that grump wants wells, they can take out the pans and put them in a tin themselves. If the pans were not a weird size tho, so maybe gift them the 35 tin if you are so inclined to throw costly gifts at them.

With regards to the paints themselves, they granulate easy, are vibrant, pigment rich, and hardly granulate at all. Which is just what I needed here.

A mistake was made with regards to the band of blue at the top. I thought it was Ultramarine Blue but it turns out the print uses Prussian Blue not only in this print but in many others as well. That should teach me to read the wikipedia page before painting the painting and blogging and posting the blog post.

Ultramarine (Daniel Smith), Cerulean Blue, Paynes Grey, Madder Lake Red Light, Green.

I bet Prussian blue would have gone better with the Cerulean Blue as well.

The Great Wave of Kanagawa, looking east.

The art of Japanese wood prints always fascinated me, ever since I first encountered them. On my walls are a few cheap prints I bought almost twenty years ago. The best known master of the art of Japanese wood prints is Hokusai.

One of the best known pieces is “The Great Wave of Kanagawa“, which comes from the series “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji“. I know these are a ton of wikipedia links, but looking for things to draw I found myself wondering if it would be worthwhile to do watercolor renditions of the art of Hokusai. The serie consists of the aformented 36 plus another 10 made later when the original series turned out to be very successful. A total of 46 drawings.

Considering the Perfect Sketchbook has 44 pages but also is covered in watercolor paper on the inside of the front cover and I can tear out the back pocket and replace it with a sheet of paper I have lying around, I could do 46 water color paintings in the one book and thus a new project was born.

This is 1/46 and it was great fun to make, looking forward to the coming months while I do them all.

Daniel Smith paints: Pthalo Blue GS for the waves, Buff Titanium and Jane’s Grey for the boats, Moon Glow for the lower sky, Quinacrodone Gold and Quinacrodone Rose for the upper sky.